google-site-verification: google28f501b00d980d5f.html Researchers find part of the missing link between high insulin and laminitis - Vetpol Community

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Researchers find part of the missing link between high insulin and laminitis

Collapse
X
Collapse

  • Researchers find part of the missing link between high insulin and laminitis

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Spillers.jpg
Views:	133
Size:	35.2 KB
ID:	48509
    Veterinary researchers in Australia have identified a possible mechanistic link between high levels of insulin and equine laminitis.

    The study, which investigated the effects of insulin on equine hoof lamellar cells in the laboratory, was conducted by the University of Melbourne’s Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Science, in conjunction with the WALTHAM® Equine Studies Group, which underpins the science behind the SPILLERS® brand. It has recently been published in the research journal PeerJ1.

    High levels of the hormone insulin have been known for some time to cause acute endocrine laminitis – this is the most common form of the condition, seen when ponies and certain types of horses graze lush pasture or consume a starch- or sugar-rich diet, or when they develop PPID (pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction, also known as Cushing’s syndrome).

    Many ponies and horses at risk of the condition produce large spikes of insulin in their blood stream after consuming meals high in non-structural carbohydrates (in particular starch and simple sugars) which indicates that this could be the way in which they succumb to acute endocrine laminitis.
    The mechanism by which insulin, a metabolic hormone known best for its role clearing glucose from the blood stream, can cause effects in the foot leading to laminitis has been the subject of much debate in recent years. Hormones like insulin must interact with a specific receptor on the surface of cells in order to produce their effects. What has confused researchers in the past is that there appear to be no insulin receptors on the hoof lamellar cells (these cells give the lamellar tissues their strength and changes to their growth or structure weaken the bonds and cause laminitis).

    The researchers considered the close similarities between insulin and a growth factor hormone called insulin-like growth factor -1 (IGF-1). There are receptors for IGF-1 on the lamellar cells, and the researchers speculated that high concentrations of insulin might be able to cross-stimulate these cells by activating the IGF-1 receptors. To investigate this possibility PhD student Courtnay Baskerville, together with her supervisor Professor Simon Bailey, developed a method for culturing lamellar epithelial cells in the laboratory, and incubated them with increasing concentrations of insulin.
    They found that high concentrations of insulin stimulated the cells to proliferate. Furthermore, this effect could be prevented using an antibody that specifically blocks only the IGF-1 receptor. Further downstream effects within the cells were also shown. The changes seemed to occur mainly at very high concentrations of insulin. Similar concentration levels can be seen in ponies and horses with insulin dysregulation linked to Equine Metabolic Syndrome, but are not commonly seen in normal horses that are considered to be at lower risk of laminitis.

    Further work is now ongoing to determine exactly how these cellular changes induced by sustained high insulin concentrations might cause laminitis. However, it seems that targeting the IGF-1 receptor may be an option for developing new drugs to prevent and treat laminitis.

    Professor Simon Bailey said: “The information gathered in this study provides the equine industry worldwide with valuable insights into the causes of the common and serious condition of laminitis. The research group would like to acknowledge the support of the WALTHAM® Centre for Pet Nutrition, in particular the involvement of Professor Pat Harris.”

    1Baskerville C.L., Chockalingham, S., Harris, P.A., Bailey S.R. (2018). The effect of insulin on equine lamellar basal epithelial cells mediated by the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor. PeerJ 6:e5945 (DOI 10.7717/peerj.5945).
    Attached Files
      Posting comments is disabled.

    Categories

    Collapse

    Article Tags

    Collapse

    Latest Articles

    Collapse

    • Zoetis UK Ltd – We Have Moved
      by Kristina Kisbee

      Zoetis Ltd would like to let those of you who may not know we have moved to a new office location. As of the 17th June our new home is;

      Zoetis UK Ltd, First Floor, Birchwood Building, Springfield Drive, Leatherhead, Surrey, KT22 7LP


      It is an exciting move which sees us set up in a brand-new office space. A new space that is much appreciated as we continue to grow our teams to support our evolving range of products and solutions we offer across the continuum of care....
      Today, 01:02 PM
    • Davies Green Team takes action for World Environment Day
      by Kristina Kisbee


      The enthusiastic Green Group at Davies Veterinary Specialists (Davies), Hertfordshire got stuck in to World Environment Day last week, as part of their continual commitment to sustainability in practice. As well as encouraging staff to make pledges, calculate their own carbon footprints, and pedal to make smoothies, they unveiled a pet owner newsletter to make suggestions on green pet ownership and offered reusable water bottles to clients seen at Davies on June 5th.

      World
      ...
      Today, 09:24 AM
    • Purina reveals a revolutionary approach to managing cat allergens
      by Kristina Kisbee


      For the first time in history, Purina scientists demonstrate a proactive way to significantly reduce the active levels of the major cat allergen, Fel d1, at its source in cats’ saliva. As many as one in five adults worldwide are sensitised to cat allergens.

      Avoiding cats is a cornerstone of managing allergens, an approach that may leave cats looking for a new home. Taking advantage of natural allergen-antibody interactions, Purina researchers discovered how to safely
      ...
      Today, 09:20 AM
    • Vets urged to THINK TWICE this Dry Eye Awareness Month
      by Kristina Kisbee


      Ocular conditions account for around one in ten canine consultations in first opinion practices1 and in the lead up to Dry Eye Awareness Month, Bayer are asking vets to think twice about their approach to Dry Eye management.

      In the case of KCS, early diagnosis and treatment can have a significant impact on prognosis, but unfortunately, 46% of dog owners are not aware of the risks.2 Some KCS cases may present with quite mild clinical signs, particularly in the early stages
      ...
      14-06-2019, 07:07 AM
    • Record-breaking VET Festival Champions Wellness
      by Kristina Kisbee


      Notching up record delegate and exhibitor numbers for 2019, this year’s VET Festival, received an overwhelmingly positive response from delegates for the calibre of speakers and entertainment. The event took place at Loseley Park, Guildford on 7-8 June.

      With wellness a strong focus for VET Festival, the Wellness lecture tent was packed for Lara Heimann, an American who has achieved global recognition for her unique vinyasa yoga style and regularly leads international
      ...
      14-06-2019, 07:06 AM
    • Vetsure launch new Large Animal and Equine Buysure Platinum buying group services
      by Kristina Kisbee


      Since their inception 10 years ago, Vetsure have been offering market-leading purchase savings to all practice types through their Buysure for Vets and Buysure Platinum buying groups. Until recently, however, their Platinum offering – whereby members benefit from corporate terms in return for use of preferred products – has been limited to small animal practices. That has all changed now with the launch of the LA/Equine Buysure Platinum Group.

      “There is considerable disruption
      ...
      13-06-2019, 11:51 AM
    Working...
    X