google-site-verification: google28f501b00d980d5f.html Research reveals new data on deadly dog disease - Vetpol Community

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Research reveals new data on deadly dog disease

Collapse
X
Collapse

  • Research reveals new data on deadly dog disease

    Vets have taken a further step into understanding the deadly dog disease Alabama Rot, but have warned that identifying the exact cause and potentially finding a cure, will take more time.

    The research, undertaken by the Royal Veterinary College and Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists, revealed almost 95% of confirmed cases of Alabama Rot, clinically known as CRGV (Cutaneous Renal and Glomerular Vasculopathy), have occurred between November and May.

    It also found most of the cases have been confirmed in western and southern parts of England; far fewer cases have been reported from the eastern half of the country and East Anglia in particular.

    However, vets have stressed that cases of Alabama Rot in the UK are still extremely rare and further research is required to establish more details on how dogs develop the disease.

    David Walker, the UK’s leading expert on the condition and co-author of the research, from Anderson Moores said: “This research, which was funded by the New Forest Dog Owners Group and the charity Alabama Rot Research Fund, was designed to look for geographical patterns, as well as environmental and climatic risk factors.

    “A distinct seasonal pattern is suggested, with the vast majority of cases occurring between November and March, and limited cases over the summer months – just 6.5% of cases have been confirmed from June to October.

    “In the scientific world a lot of research is not earth-shattering, but it all builds together and little by little we make progress.

    This information is good in terms of how we manage the next stage of research, however we need to be careful and not jump to any conclusions at this point.

    “Any concerned dog owners should visit www.vets4pets.com/stop-alabama-rot/ for advice and a map of confirmed cases.”

    The disease has been reported in a wide range of breeds (35 in total) but, due to the small number of cases, it is not yet possible to say with any certainty whether a specific breed has an inherently increased or decreased risk of the disease.

    Any patterns may simply be the result of varying breed populations in different parts of the country.

    Dr Huw Stacey, vet and director of clinical services at Vets4Pets, has been supporting research on the condition for a number of years.

    He said: “Since we held the first Alabama Rot conference in May 2017, vets and relevant professionals have been working hard to understand more about the condition.

    “We know how the disease presents and how it affects dogs internally, and this research adds some interesting information that may help to increase vets’ index of the suspicion for the disease.

    “The information on climate and ground type will help us further explore possible triggers for the disease, but at the moment we can’t say if any breeds are more likely to develop the disease.

    “The first sign of the disease that is normally seen is a skin sore or lesion that isn’t caused by a known injury. Most commonly these sores are found on the lower half of the leg and appear as a distinct swelling, a patch of red skin or are open and ulcer-like.

    “With 46 cases in 2018 already, it is understandably very worrying for dog owners, but we think the increase in cases is partially due to an increased awareness of the disease.

    “However, this disease is still very rare, so we’re advising dog owners to remain calm but vigilant, and seek advice from their local vet if their dog develops unexplained skin lesions.

    “While this research may be a stepping stone to finding the cause of Alabama Rot, there is currently no known way to prevent a dog from contracting the disease.”

    The highest number of cases have been seen in West Sussex, Dorset, southern Hampshire, Greater Manchester and Monmouthshire.

    February has seen the highest number of cases, with December to March having 70.50% of overall confirmed cases.

    David added: “Of course dog owners, particularly those in the areas with higher numbers of cases, may be nervous about Alabama Rot, but it’s still an extremely rare disease and we’d encourage owners to continue exercising their pet as normal.

    “We’ve seen cases of dogs walked with other dogs, in the same place every day, developing the disease, while the other dogs remained completely unaffected.

    “If a dog becomes affected, the best chance of recovery lies with early and intensive veterinary care at a specialist facility such as Anderson Moores or the Royal Veterinary College.

    “Any dog owners who are worried that their pet might have Alabama Rot should contact their veterinary practice immediately.

    “This will help build knowledge about the disease and also give a dog the best chance of survival.

    “Research will continue and, in time, we all hope the cause will be identified.”

    In total, the UK has now seen 169 confirmed cases of Alabama Rot across 38 counties, since 2012:
    • 6 in 2012
    • 5 in 2013
    • 32 in 2014
    • 21 in 2015
    • 19 in 2016
    • 40 in 2017
    • 46 so far in 2018


      Posting comments is disabled.

    Categories

    Collapse

    Article Tags

    Collapse

    Latest Articles

    Collapse

    • Vet Surgeon specialist in Diagnostic Imaging required at Evidensia Referral Animal Hospital - Helsingborg, Sweden
      IVC
      Evidensia Referral Animal Hospital of Helsingborg is an around the clock open hospital with high competence in diagnostic imaging, surgery, oncology, internal medicine, and emergency care. We have a highly specialized team and our focus is development, education and availability for our patients! The case load is high and varying, which gives a lot of new experience in a short amount of time.

      Since we are constantly expanding, we are looking for a colleague who are specialist in diagnostic...
      15-02-2019, 01:54 PM
    • BSAVA gives free library access to vets in developing nations
      Kristina Kisbee

      Vets in developing nations can now access free educational resources from the British Small Animal Veterinary Association’s online library.

      Vets working and training in countries with limited resources, where conditions are challenging or training is expensive,can now access the BSAVA’s ‘Foundation Collection’, via a partnership with WSAVA, the WSAVA Foundation, and FECAVA.

      More than 70 items of content are available for free, including articles, lectures and book
      ...
      15-02-2019, 01:28 PM
    • RVN required at Animals 1st Vets - Macmerry, East Lothian
      IVC
      Animals 1st Vets are a small, friendly practice and we are looking for a caring, enthusiastic and confident Registered Veterinary Nurse to join our team.

      Ideally you will be 1-2 years qualified, a great team player with a compassionate and caring nature.

      We have a range of modern equipment including digital ultrasound, digital x-ray, in-house lab and expert knowledge available amongst our team of vets, nurses and visiting specialists.

      This is a full time...
      15-02-2019, 10:26 AM
    • Feline infectious peritonitis: human antiviral ‘GS-441524’ shows great promise against this devastating infectious disease of cats
      Kristina Kisbee

      The emergence of exotic diseases such as Ebola and SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) in people has prompted intensive research into new drug treatments, and this is indirectly bringing benefit to cats. Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is one of a number of chronic viral infections of cats that resemble those in people, and is estimated to kill up to 1.4% of cats around the world. The infectious agent is a mutant coronavirus (FIPV) that is notoriously difficult to control: the parent enteric coronavirus is present in virtually all catteries and shelters and is shed...
      15-02-2019, 09:29 AM
    • Davies becomes a Mindful Employer
      Kristina Kisbee

      Davies Veterinary Specialists (Davies) in Hertfordshire has shown its commitment to the recruitment and retention of employees by signing up to the Charter for Employees who are Positive about Mental Health. The multi-specialist veterinary referral hospital also proudly took part in Time To Talk Day last week for which they hosted a series of well-received events. The Charter for Employees who are Positive about Mental Health is a voluntary agreement seeking to support employers in working within the spirit of its positive approach. The Charter is one element of the MINDFUL EMPLOYER initiative ...
      15-02-2019, 09:23 AM
    • Vet required at Beeches Veterinary Centre - Wiltshire
      IVC
      The Beeches Veterinary Centre is a dedicated RCVS Accredited Small Animal Practice in Melksham, Wiltshire looking to expand our team. We will consider full time and part time candidates. We take pride in providing excellence in patient and client care alike, while being part of a fun and supportive team. We aim to make full use of and develop staff skills within an open and trusting environment and to encourage education for our team members as well as clients.

      As a Small Animal Vet,...
      14-02-2019, 11:30 AM
    Working...
    X