google-site-verification: google28f501b00d980d5f.html Survey highlights dental disease in UK horses - Vetpol Community

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Survey highlights dental disease in UK horses

Collapse
X
Collapse

  • Survey highlights dental disease in UK horses

    Click image for larger version

Name:	horsesteeth.jpeg
Views:	2
Size:	36.7 KB
ID:	45565

    Zoetis UK today announced that results from the latest National Equine Health Survey show that dental disease is a significant problem for horses in the UK. Of the horses included in the survey 5.4% were suffering from trouble with their teeth and dental disease was the sixth most frequently recorded individual disease syndrome in the survey.1

    The results suggest horses in the UK commonly have dental abnormalities and reiterate the importance of raising awareness of equine dental disease. In another veterinary study, dental abnormalities were detected in a huge 94% of geriatric horses yet only a quarter of these animals were reported by the owner to have a dental problem. Although this may in part be due to historical abnormalities detected at examination, the authors suggested that dental disease may be under-reported by owners.2

    NEHS is an annual snapshot survey, conducted by Blue Cross in conjunction with the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA). 5,235 people took part in the 2017 survey and returned records for 15,433 horses. A total of 841 of these horses were recorded as having problems with their teeth, with 54% treated by a veterinarian and 46% receiving attention from an equine dental technician.1

    The horse has up to 44 teeth, set in a powerful jaw. As herbivores, horses munch their way through on average 2.5% of their bodyweight in forage and feed every day to maintain their weight – that’s 12.5kg (dry matter) of food chomping for a 500kg horse. This is why it’s so important to keep your horse’s teeth in good working order.3

    Just like humans, horses can have many problems with their teeth such as loose or broken teeth, excessively worn teeth, infections and gum disease. It’s crucial to identify problems early, preferably before symptoms occur, to minimise discomfort and maximise chances of successful treatment. The 2017 survey showed that 92% of horses received regular dental checks with approximately two thirds receiving annual checks and one third receiving checks every six months.

    Dr Wendy Talbot, equine vet at Zoetis commented: “It is tricky to know if a horse has dental problems because you can’t see inside the mouth and often there won’t be any obvious symptoms. This is why regular check-ups are so important. It’s reassuring to see that a high percentage of horses are receiving regular dental checks. Ideally your horse’s teeth should be examined by your vet or qualified equine dental technician every 6- 12 months.”

    It is often best for your horse to be lightly sedated before a dental examination as this allows for a safer and more thorough procedure with minimal distress for your horse. Only your vet is qualified to sedate your horse.

    Zoetis has recently supported an equine dentistry roadshow with Chris Pearce MRCVS, founder of the Equine Dental Clinic, to help vets develop their knowledge and practical skills in equine dentistry.

    For further information on equine dentistry, worming and many other aspects of horse care visit www.horsedialog.co.uk.


    References

    1.National Equine Health Survey 2017
    The top five disease syndromes recorded this year were:
    1. Skin diseases 31.1% compared to 25.5% in 2016 (17.2% in 2015, 18.3% in 2014, 14.6% in 2013 and 15.2% in 2010-12). Sweet itch and mud fever were the most frequently reported individual syndromes within this category and made up 6.1% of all returns (6.8% in 2016).
    2. Lameness (including laminitis) 23.4% compared to 32.9%in 2016, (24.4% in 2015, 21% in 2014, 19.2% in 2013 and 12.9% in 2010-12). Overall, as in previous years, if laminitis is excluded from the analysis, lameness due to problems in the limbs proximal to the foot was more common than problems in the foot.
    3. Metabolic diseases 8.1% with PPID (‘Equine Cushing’s disease’) accounting for 73.4% of this figure, consistent with previous NEHS findings.
    4. Eye problems 7.6% with ocular discharge (weepy eye) accounting for 54.2% of all ocular syndromes recorded.
    5. Gastrointestinal problems 7.5% with gastric ulcers accounting for 39% of this figure and 3% all syndromes recorded (2.7% in 2016)
    2. IRELAND J. L., CLEGG P. D. , McGOWAN C. M. et al (2012) Comparison of owner-reported health problems with veterinary assessment of geriatric horses in the United Kingdom. Equine Veterinary Journal, 44 (2012) 94–100

    3. National Research Council, Nutrient Requirements of Horses 2007 Sixth Revised Edition
    Attached Files
      Posting comments is disabled.

    Categories

    Collapse

    Article Tags

    Collapse

    Latest Articles

    Collapse

    • VMA Annual Awards: Advertising Campaign Award
      Kristina Kisbee

      The Veterinary Marketing Association (VMA) flagship Annual Awards take place on 15th March 2019 at the 5-star Royal Lancaster London hotel. As the premier veterinary marketing event of the year, the Awards provide a great opportunity for marketing professionals to showcase their skill and professionalism in marketing their products and services, says VMA Awards chair, Claire Edmunds.

      “There are 18 awards spanning all aspects of veterinary marketing, including the Young...
      Today, 04:05 PM
    • OnsiorTM (6 mg tablets) receives new indication to treat pain and inflammation in cats with chronic musculoskeletal disease
      Kristina Kisbee

      Elanco is delighted to announce Onsior (6 mg tablets) has been licensed for the treatment of pain and inflammation associated with chronic musculoskeletal disorders in cats.

      The new indication is in addition to its existing license for acute pain and inflammation.

      Vets now have another option when choosing the most suitable and effective treatment for cats with chronic musculoskeletal pain and can have confidence in the robust safety profile of Onsior 6 mg tablets
      ...
      Today, 04:03 PM
    • International equine welfare veterinarian Alex Atock publishes memoir of pathfinding organizational change to benefit “My Friend the Horse”
      Kristina Kisbee

      “My Friend, The Horse”, a new autobiography of international veterinarian Alex Atock, MRCVS, details 35 years of landmark equine health and welfare developments, such as:
      ● Changes in international equestrian sports while the author was head of the Veterinary Department of the Fédération Équestre Internationale (FEI), particularly related to inspection and medication of horses;
      ● Insight into equine care education in developing world while responsible for
      ...
      Today, 08:25 AM
    • Sick of gasping for breath - airway surgery could be considered for GI problems - WSAVA article
      Kristina Kisbee


      Everyone knows that brachycephalic dogs have a lot of health problems. Professor Nick Jeffery, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Small Animal Practice, our Official Scientific Journal, highlights a paper that suggests some of these may be linked...

      Many brachycephalic dogs have difficulties with breathing, but many also show frequent vomiting or regurgitation, or both. In this month’s JSAP, Dr Kaye and colleagues show evidence that airway and GI problems may be linked,
      ...
      Today, 08:11 AM
    • Grapiprant a breakthrough for osteoarthritic dogs?
      Kristina Kisbee

      Grapiprant is a new class of drug for treating ‘pain associated with mild to moderate osteoarthritis in dogs’. A balanced appraisal of this new drug is now available from Veterinary Prescriber in the form of a succinct online learning module. Anyone who does the module will:·
      • Understand the pharmacology of grapiprant.
      • Know the clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of grapiprant.
      • Be aware of what is known about how grapiprant compares with NSAIDs.
      • Understand what is meant by
      ...
      Yesterday, 02:06 PM
    • Equissage Pulse announce results of scientifically proven research
      Kristina Kisbee

      Equissage Pulse are pleased to announce the results of scientifically proven research, recently published on the Journal of Equine Veterinary Science website, into the benefits that a 20-Minute Cycloidal Vibration has on Whole Horse Locomotion and Thoracolumbar Profiles.

      Carried out at The Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery by Centaur Biomechanics, the independent blinded randomised controlled study delivers a verdict of the positive efficacy of cycloidal vibration therapy when...
      Yesterday, 12:53 PM
    Working...
    X